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Back To Basics

We are all familiar with maintaining our lab instruments, but how often do we perform maintenance on our lab methods or SOPs?

In Fun with Viscosity, RheoSense, Inc., General Information, Rheometer, Viscometer, microVISC, Applications, Viscosity Measurements, viscosity, Standards, FYI

Latest Release & Upcoming Events

In the upcoming weeks, we are proud to announce the release of our latest application note regarding concentration dependence in protein viscosity. In this app note, Dr. Stacey Elliott gathered viscosity data for Bovine Gamma Globulin (BgG) formulations over the full concentration range, including therapeutic levels ≥ 100 mg/mL, using the VROC®Initium. The solution buffer included sucrose which is a common additive to enhance stabilization during freeze-drying and storage. Relative viscosity versus concentration curves were fit with the Ross-Minton equation which is a frequently used analysis tool for protein formulations.

To view application note, click below!

DOWNLOAD APPLICATION NOTE

In Viscosity Measurements, Protein Solutions, bovine gamma globulin, shear rate sweep, Announcement, viscosity, Fun with Viscosity, VROC Technology, RheoSense News, Small Sample Viscometer, Viscometer, General Information, Rheometer, Proteins

Impact of ph in Royal Jelly 

According to Cell Press, "Royal jelly is produced in [two different] glands of worker bees, one that produces the protein in a neutral pH and one that produces fatty acids that can reduce said pH when the two secretions" come together (Cell Press).

For a honeybee, royal jelly is a crucial diet for the first couple days for all bees. And for honeybee larvae to become queen, the larvae must be fed and be surrounded by royal jelly for it to morph successfully. However, because queen larvae, "are too big to fit into the cells of the hive's honeycomb," they are able to hang upside down in the queen's cell anchored with the royal jelly (Cell Press). So, what allows this royal jelly to acquire these properties? 

Turns out, royal jelly is not always thick and sticky. In a recent study, researchers proposed that the viscosity of a royal jelly were dependent the particle size of a protein found in royal jelly (known as royalactin, or MRJP1) was directly correlated to the pH level found inside. The study conveyed that there was a noticeable size difference within the MRJP1 jelly when exposed to a purifier at pH 4 and at neutral (pH 7). For instance, "Most purification protocols are standardized at pH 7, [which yielded] a strange, runny consistency [within the jelly]" whereas when maintained between pH 4 and pH 5, the viscosity of the jelly seemed gelatinous and almost adherent (Cell Press). The precise pH affects the overall viscosity of royal jelly, which is an essential component in providing the optimal environment for the queen bee to develop in her early stages. If the pH levels were outside 4~5, the royal jelly would lose its heavy, sticky properties and would not be able to hold the queen larvae. 

In viscosity, Applications, Proteins, Viscosity Measurements, Fun with Viscosity
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