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Different Ways to Measure Viscosity

Measuring viscosity dates back to as early as the 19th century. French physicist Jean Poiseuille discovered the concept of measuring viscosity by formulating the "mathematical expression for the flow rate for the laminar flow of fluids in circular tubes." Later on, this formulation was discovered by a German hydraulic engineer Gotthilf Hagen, which came to be known as the Hagen-Poiseuille equation (Britannica). Early measurements of viscosity focused primarily on the flow of blood. Measurements were conducted using the hemodynamometer that incorporated narrow tubes & glass capillaries in effort to measure the pressures in the arteries of horses and dogs (Sutera). 

In Viscosity Measurements, VROC Technology, Biotechnology, Rheometer, m-VROC, General Information, Viscometer, Small Sample Viscometer, viscosity, Automatic Viscometer, High throughput Viscometer, FYI

First Order from Saudi Arabia

Recently we received our first order from Saudi Arabia. The order is from the leading university in Saudi Arabia and they order an m-VROC® with multiple chips.

In General Information, RheoSense, Inc., RheoSense News, RheoSense Clients, viscosity

Are you in the Race?

A Robot Be Doing Your Job In 5 Years

We have all read this click bait title many times over. 

Yes, we are at the dawn of the autonomous revolution and ultimately, some jobs will be replaced by robots. The good news is that this revolution is going to accelerate science and technology at a rapid pace. The companies and individuals who invest and embrace automation will have a large competitive advantage over those who stick to traditional techniques.

In Viscosity Measurements, Applications, Viscometer, viscosity, Automatic Viscometer, High throughput Viscometer

Bartholomew & the Oobleck? Non-Newtonian Fluid?

Oobleck, a common name for the final product of mixing corn starch with water. Not only is it named after the mysterious materials falling from the sky in the Dr Seus's story, "Bartholomew & the Oobleck," this combination of materials is a great example of non-Newtonian fluid. (What is a non-Newtonian Fluid? What is Newtonian?

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In viscosity, Fun with Viscosity