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RheoSense Blog: In Viscosity News...

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RheoSense Blog

Viscosity Reduction in Protein Solutions

Posted by Joseph Chun

Apr 3, 2018 1:46:34 PM

In case you haven't seen it yet, we released a new app note last week regarding viscosity reduction in protein solutions. In this application note, Dr. Elliott discusses the idea that the viscosity of a protein solution depends on the nature of the individual and protein-protein interaction (PPI). Both of the individual characteristics, such as size and shape, as well as the pair interactions can be influenced by components in the buffer formulation. As a result, it is often desirable to reduce viscosity values so that formulations are suitable for a particular application or process (ie: injection).

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Topics: viscosity, Protein Solutions, bovine gamma globulin, shear rate sweep, Amino acids, Viscosity Reduction

Impact of ph in Royal Jelly 

Posted by Joseph Chun

Mar 27, 2018 12:31:36 PM

According to Cell Press, "Royal jelly is produced in [two different] glands of worker bees, one that produces the protein in a neutral pH and one that produces fatty acids that can reduce said pH when the two secretions" come together (Cell Press).

For a honeybee, royal jelly is a crucial diet for the first couple days for all bees. And for honeybee larvae to become queen, the larvae must be fed and be surrounded by royal jelly for it to morph successfully. However, because queen larvae, "are too big to fit into the cells of the hive's honeycomb," they are able to hang upside down in the queen's cell anchored with the royal jelly (Cell Press). So, what allows this royal jelly to acquire these properties? 

Turns out, royal jelly is not always thick and sticky. In a recent study, researchers proposed that the viscosity of a royal jelly were dependent the particle size of a protein found in royal jelly (known as royalactin, or MRJP1) was directly correlated to the pH level found inside. The study conveyed that there was a noticeable size difference within the MRJP1 jelly when exposed to a purifier at pH 4 and at neutral (pH 7). For instance, "Most purification protocols are standardized at pH 7, [which yielded] a strange, runny consistency [within the jelly]" whereas when maintained between pH 4 and pH 5, the viscosity of the jelly seemed gelatinous and almost adherent (Cell Press). The precise pH affects the overall viscosity of royal jelly, which is an essential component in providing the optimal environment for the queen bee to develop in her early stages. If the pH levels were outside 4~5, the royal jelly would lose its heavy, sticky properties and would not be able to hold the queen larvae. 

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Topics: Viscosity Measurements, Applications, Proteins, viscosity, Fun with Viscosity

Coffee And Cannabis: Same System, Different Reaction

Posted by Joseph Chun

Mar 20, 2018 11:00:00 AM

According to a GEN – genetic engineering & biotechnology article, researchers found that the consumption of coffee stimulates the complex network of neurotransmitters, also known as the endocannabinoid system (ECS), much like that of cannabis. ECS consists of a biological structure composed of endocannabinoids, which are essentially the "small molecules that activate the cannabinoid receptors" (Jikomes). ECS is a system that is necessary in maintaining homeostasis on a cellular level. Furthermore, ECS is also responsible as it acts as a regulator for stress response, appetite, addiction, energy, and much more (GEN).

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Topics: General Information, Clinical Diagnosis

Different Ways to Measure Viscosity

Posted by Joseph Chun

Mar 13, 2018 8:20:07 PM

Measuring viscosity dates back to as early as the 19th century. French physicist Jean Poiseuille discovered the concept of measuring viscosity by formulating the "mathematical expression for the flow rate for the laminar flow of fluids in circular tubes." Later on, this formulation was discovered by a German hydraulic engineer Gotthilf Hagen, which came to be known as the Hagen-Poiseuille equation (Britannica). Early measurements of viscosity focused primarily on the flow of blood. Measurements were conducted using the hemodynamometer that incorporated narrow tubes & glass capillaries in effort to measure the pressures in the arteries of horses and dogs (Sutera). 

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Topics: Viscosity Measurements, VROC Technology, Biotechnology, Rheometer, m-VROC, General Information, Viscometer, Small Sample Viscometer, viscosity, Automatic Viscometer, High throughput Viscometer, FYI

Join Us For Dinner in Boston

Posted by Joseph Chun

Feb 27, 2018 3:43:15 PM

Loyal Customers & Friends,

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In the Blink of an Eye - Viscosity of Eye Drops

Posted by Joseph Chun

Jan 23, 2018 10:32:36 AM

Wow, it's already more than halfway through January within the new year. Time really does fly, huh? We hope that 2018 has been good and already have been a learning experience so far.

Formulate your eye drops properly

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Topics: m-VROC, General Information, Proteins, Viscometer, Small Sample Viscometer, Application Focus

Our Customer Base is Expanding like Our Appetites for the Holidays!

Posted by Eric Ng

Nov 14, 2017 4:00:00 AM

As we head into the holidays of 2017, we are expanding with many new customers.Including our recent new end user in Saudi Arabia and more, orders from overseas subsidiaries or partners are growing!

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Topics: RheoSense International Partners, RheoSense News, RheoSense Clients, Announcement

First Order from Saudi Arabia

Posted by Eric Ng

Oct 10, 2017 7:48:25 PM

Recently we received our first order from Saudi Arabia. The order is from the leading university in Saudi Arabia and they order an m-VROC® with multiple chips.

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Topics: General Information, RheoSense, Inc., RheoSense News, RheoSense Clients, viscosity

What is the worlds longest running lab experiment?

Posted by Rick Paulino

Oct 3, 2017 7:00:00 AM

Back in 1927, Australia’s University of Queensland physicist Thomas Parnell started what is now recognized by the Guinness Book of World Records as the longest running lab experiment. Dr. Parnell wanted to examine the viscosity of pitch, a tar like substance, by observing the speed at which it flows from a funnel into a jar. Since the pitch was first poured in 1927, only nine drops have fallen, with the last one occurring in April 2014.

This long running experiment has applications that remain relevant to high viscosity polymers and liquids seen in today’s applications. One such application is in 3D inks which can have viscosities greater than 50,000cP.

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Topics: Fun with Viscosity

LAPONITE - Use to Enhance Cell Growth & Drug Delivery

Posted by Grace

Sep 13, 2017 9:19:53 PM

Laponite is an additive which is by definition, "a unique specialty additive; a layered silicate manufactured from naturally occurring inorganic mineral sources." The main purpose in which Laponite serves can be separated into two major uses:

1) Rheology Modifier — Laponite is added to various consumer products to improve stability; many products have been shear sensitive or thixotropic behavior. Laponite is often used as a thickener in cosmetics.

2) Film Former  Laponite produces film to create electrically conductive coatings

Aside from these two major uses, Laponite has been used in the healthcare industry as a bioink additive to hydrogels, enabling a habitable environment for stem cells and also playing a role in creating a biodegradable containment for drug delivery.

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Topics: Applications, Automatic Viscometer, Inks Viscosity, Application Focus

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