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Flexible Flagella

A recent study has been released by brilliant researchers at Penn State. Upon careful research, it has been discovered that bacteria plays a role in viscosity. Solutions where bacteria is highly concentrated, it was observed that there was a decrease in viscosity. Initially thought to be a result of high concentrations, researchers dug deeper.

In Applications

Lubricant Health & Viscosity

As a lubricant begins to breakdown it undergoes significant viscosity changes. These viscosity changes can play a critical role in the life and performance of moving parts. For example, knowing when to change the engine oil in a car is straightforward, every 3,000 to 5,000 miles is a good rule of thumb. Going beyond the recommended scheduled oil change runs the risk of critical component failure leading to engine damage. However, what if you don’t have a convenient method, like miles driven, to gauge the health of your lubricant? How will you know when the lubricant begins to breakdown? The solution to this is knowing your viscosity!

In Viscosity Measurements, Applications, Oil Viscosity

Are you in the Race?

A Robot Be Doing Your Job In 5 Years

We have all read this click bait title many times over. 

Yes, we are at the dawn of the autonomous revolution and ultimately, some jobs will be replaced by robots. The good news is that this revolution is going to accelerate science and technology at a rapid pace. The companies and individuals who invest and embrace automation will have a large competitive advantage over those who stick to traditional techniques.

In Viscosity Measurements, Applications, Viscometer, viscosity, Automatic Viscometer, High throughput Viscometer

What Happens if You Stir a Cup of Zero Viscosity Coffee?

First of all, the question is-- can there be a coffee or liquid with zero viscosity coffee?  We know that there is negative viscosity. Is having zero viscosity similar?

Viscosity is the resistance of a fluid to flow and it comes from the friction of molecules as they move against each other within the fluid. All fluids have at least some resistance to flow – except super fluids.

In Applications, RheoSense, Inc., viscosity, Fun with Viscosity